Different CloudForms Catalogs for Different Groups

One of the largest value propositions of DevOps is the concept of Self Service provisioning. If you can remove human interaction from resource allocation, you can reduce both the response time and the likelihood of error in configuration. Red Hat CloudForms has a self service feature that allows a user to select from predefined services. You may wish to show different users different catalog items. This might be for security reasons, such as the set of credentials required and provided, or merely to reduce clutter and focus the end user on specific catalog items. Perhaps some items are still undergoing testing and are not ready for general consumption.

Obviously, these predefined services may not match your entire user population.

I’ve been working on setting up a CloudForms instance where members of different groups see different service catalogs. Here is what I did.
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Mirroring Keystone Delegations in FreeIPA/389DS

This is more musing than a practical design.

Most application servers have a means to query LDAP for the authorization information for a user.  This is separate from, and follows after, authentication which may be using one of multiple mechanism, possibly not even querying LDAP (although that would be strange).

And there are other mechanisms (SAML2, SSSD+mod_lookup_identity) that can, also, provide the authorization attributes.
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Tripleo HA Federation Proof-of-Concept

Keystone has supported identity federation for several releases. I have been working on a proof-of-concept integration of identity federation in a TripleO deployment. I was able to successfully login to Horizon via WebSSO, and want to share my notes.

A federation deployment requires changes to the network topology, Keystone, the HTTPD service, and Horizon. The various OpenStack deployment tools will have their own ways of applying these changes. While this proof-of-concept can’t be called production-ready, it does demonstrate that TripleO can support Federation using SAML. From this proof-of-concept, we should be to deduce the necessary steps needed for a production deployment.

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De-conflicting Swift-Proxy with FreeIPA

Port 8080 is a popular port. Tomcat uses it as the default port for unencrypted traffic. FreeIA, installs Dogtag which runs in Tomcat. Swift proxy also chose that port number for its traffic. This means that if one is run on that port, the other cannot. Of the two, it is easier to change FreeIPA, as the port is only used for internal traffic, where as Swift’s port is in the service catalog and the documentation.
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