JSON Home Tests and Keystone API changes

If you change the public signature of an API, or add a new API in Keystone, there is a good chance the Tests that confirm JSON home layout will break.  And that test is fairly unfriendly:  It compares a JSON doc with another JSON doc, and spews out the entirety of both JSON docs, without telling you which section breaks.  Here is how I deal with it:

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Running Unit Tests on Old Versions of Keystone

Just because Icehouse is EOL does not mean no one is running it. One part of my job is back-porting patches to older versions of Keystone that my Company supports.

A dirty secret is that we only package the code needed for the live deployment, though, not the unit tests. In the case of I need to test a bug fix against a version of Keystone that was, essentially, Upstream Icehouse.
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Rippowam

Ossipee started off as OS-IPA. As it morphed into a tool for building development clusters,I realized it was more useful to split the building of the cluster from the Install and configuration of the application on that cluster. To install IPA and OpenStack, and integrate them together, we now use an ansible-playbook called Rippowam.

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Ossipee

OpenStack is a big distributed system. FreeIPA is designed for security in distributed system. In order to develop and test each of them, separately or together, I need a distributed system. Virtualization has been a key technology for making this kind of work possible. OpenStack is great of managing virtualization. Added to that is the benefits found when we “fly our own airplanes.” Thus, I am using OpenStack to develop OpenStack.

Steve Okay took this while waiting for a flight to LAS

Early to Rise
757-200 lifts off Rwy 1 at SFO at sunrise. Credit Steve Okay. Used With Permission

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Installing RPM Build Dependencies

If you ever want to build and RPM, you need to make sure that the things it requires are installed. These are listed in the SPEC file on lines that begin with BuildRequires.  Installing these by hand is time consuming enough that it should be automated.  Here’s a first hack in Python.

 

#!/usr/bin/python
import sys
import re

build_re = re.compile('BuildRequires:.*')
compare_re = re.compile('.*=.*')


def main():
    if (len(sys.argv) > 1):
        spec = open(sys.argv[1])
        for line in spec:
            if build_re.match(line):
                for token in line.rsplit(" "):
                    if build_re.match(token):
                        continue
                    if compare_re.match(token):
                        break
                    token = token.rstrip(" ,\n\r")
                    if len(token) > 0:
                        print token


if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

To use it, save in a file called buildreqs.py and run:

sudo yum install `./buidreqs.py ~/rpmbuild/SPECS/krb5.spec`