Creating a Self Trust In Keystone

Lets say you are an administrator of an OpenStack cloud. This means you are pretty much all powerful in the deployment. Now, you need to perform some operation, but you don’t want to give it full admin privileges? Why? well, do you work as root on your Linux box? I hope note. Here’s how to set up a self trust for a reduced set of roles on your token.
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Imagining Go With Alternate Boards

The Game of Go is still pretty much the ultimate strategy game.  No other game distills strategy to its essence, in such simplicity, and thus lets the complexity emerge. 

The board is simplicity itself: a 19 X 19 Grid:

Standard Go board

One aspect of Go is that you start from the corners, build a semi-secure formation, and then grow out from there.

For example, here is a recent game of mine in the early stages:

Both my opponent and I have staked out positions in the corners.

What if the board was a little different?

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Converting a RHEL Workstation to a Server

My laptop is my Demo machine.  I need to be able to run the Red Hat cloud Suite of software on it.  I want to install this software the same way a customer would.  However, much of this software is server side software, and my machine was registered as a workstation. This means the Red Hat Content network won’t show me the server yum repositories.  Here is how I converted my machine to be a server.

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Networking Acronyms

My new role has me paying attention to the Network side of cloud a lot more than I had to in the past. One thing I’ve noticed about Networking is that it has a lot of acronyms, and people that work in it tend to throw them out in context and move on. This is my collection of recent acronyms and their meanings.

I will continue to update this one as I come across additional relevant terms and acronyms.
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Using an Ansible Tower Inventory from Command Line Ansible

In an earlier post, I wrote about using the OpenStack Ansible inventory helper when calling and Ansible command line tools. However, When developing an playbook, often there is more information pulled from the inventory than just the set of hosts. Often, the inventory also collects variables that are used in common across multiple playbooks. For this reason, and many more, I want to be able to call an Ansible playbook or Ad-Hoc command from the command line, but use the inventory as defined by an Ansible Tower instance. It turns out this is fairly simple to do, using the REST API.

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