Virtualization Setup for RH CSA study

While my company has wonderful resources to allow employees to study for our certifications, they are time limited to prevent waste. I find I’ve often kicked off the lab, only to get distracted with a reql-world-interrupt, and come back to find the lab has timed out. I like working on my own systems, and having my own servers to work on. As such, I’m setting up a complementary system to the corporate one for my own study.
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Matching Create and Teardown in an Ansible Role

Nothing lasts forever. Except some developer setups that no-one seems to know who owns, and no one is willing to tear down. I’ve tried to build the code to clean up after myself into my provisioning systems. One pattern I’ve noticed is that the same data is required for building and for cleaning up a cluster. When I built Ossipee, each task had both a create and a teardown stage. I want the same from Ansible. Here is how I’ve made it work thus far.

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Deploying an image on OpenStack that is bigger than the available flavors.

Today I tried to use our local OpenStack instance to deploy CloudForms Management Engine (CFME). Our OpenStack deployment has a set of flavors that all are defined with 20 GB Disks. The CFME image is larger than this, and will not deploy on the set of flavors. Here is how I worked around it.
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Picking the Right Hammer for the Job

Red Hat Satellite Server is a key tool in the provisioning process for the systems in our Labs.  In one of our labs we have an older deployment running Satellite 6 which maps to the upstream project The Foreman version 1.11.  Since I want to be able to perform repeatable operations on this server, I need to make Web API calls.

The easiest way to do this is to use the Hammer CLI. But it turns out the version of Hammer is somewhat tied to the version of Satellite server; the version I have in Fedora 27 Does not talk to this older Satellite instance.  So, I want to run an older Hammer.

I decided to use this as an opportunity to walk through running an RPM managed application targetted for RHEL 6/EPEL 6 via Docker.

Edit: actually, this might not be the case, but the rest of the learning process was interesting enough that I kept working at it.
Edit2: This was necessary, see the bottom. Also, the 1.11 in the URL refers to the upstream repo for theforeman. I’d use a different repo for building using supported RH RPMs.

Here is what I learned.

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