About Adam Young

Once upon a time I was an Army Officer, but that was long ago. Now I work as a Software Engineer. I climb rocks, play saxophone, and spend way too much time in front of a computer.

Reading keystone.conf in a container

Step 3 of the 12 Factor app is to store config in the environment. For Keystone, the set of configuration options is controlled by the keystone.conf file. In an earlier attempt at containerizing the scripts used to configure Keystone, I had passed an environment variable in to the script that would then be written to the configuration file. I realize now that I want the whole keystone.conf external to the application. This allow me to set any of the configuration options without changing the code in the container. More importantly, it allows me to make the configuration information immutable inside the container, so that the applications cannot be hacked to change their own configuration options.

Continue reading

Copying files into a container at run time

There are three distinct things that have to happen between installing the keystone software and running a Keystone instance. The first if management of the configuration files. Second is the database migrations, and third is the keystone bootstrap of the data base values. When coding container images to run a keystone server, not only do you need to be aware of each of these stpes, you need to make sure you are performing them in such a way that you can run scale the the Keystone server horizontally, handle zero downtime upgrades, and handle token-validating key rotations. Federated identity adds an additional twist as you need to handle the addition of httpd config changes for new identity providers.

Let’s walk through this setup in detail.

Continue reading

Injecting a Host Entry in podman-run

How does an application find its database? For all but the most embedded of solutions, the database exposes a port on a network. In a containerized development process, one container needs to find another container’s network address. But podman only exposes the IP address of a pod, not the hostname. How can we avoid hardcoding IP addresses of remote services into our containers?

Continue reading